Hogville Info
• 10,158,297 Posts
• 405,227 Topics
• 23,131 Hogvillians
THE RULES (Read 'em!)
Quick Links
Pick'Ems:Football      Basketball      Baseball
Sister Sites:Gridiron HistoryFearless Friday
Pages: 1 2 3 4 [5]   Go Down

Author Topic: Building Arkansas into a powerhouse  (Read 7787 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

jvanhorn

Re: Building Arkansas into a powerhouse
« Reply #200 on: January 05, 2019, 03:10:45 pm »

Yes, the FedEx fiasco is The CLASSIC Example of the history of LR's..."leadership." And the history of the UofA shows how long that "leadership" has..."led."

Well there is Newport and Sam Walton who they told to take a walk--and he did.  All the way to Bentonville.  Clinton who told Steve Cavender [Cavender Greek Seasonings] to hit the road---and he did.  All the way to Harrison. 

sevenof400

  • Hall of Fame Hogvillian
  • *******
  • Total likes: 285
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 11,147
  • Is it too late to remember what was best in life?
Re: Building Arkansas into a powerhouse
« Reply #201 on: January 05, 2019, 04:25:00 pm »

Let's also not forget the TVA could have been the AVA.....but that is from waaaaaaaaaay back.
Logged

Sponsored Ad



Hogville encourages you to do business with the following...

tusksincolorado

  • Hall of Fame Hogvillian
  • *******
  • Total likes: 83
  • Offline Offline
  • Gender: Male
  • Posts: 6,080
  • I will teach you Italian....the fun way.
Re: Building Arkansas into a powerhouse
« Reply #202 on: January 05, 2019, 04:46:48 pm »

Not even close to the same

19 miles from Norman to OKC, metro population 1.3mil.
190 miles to DFW metro population 6.8 million

192 Miles from Fayetteville to LR Metro population 738,000
335 miles from Fayetteville to DFW




738,000 population in LR/NLR!

Maybe 738,000 empty houses and buildings from everyone moving to NWA or Dallas!
Logged

tusksincolorado

  • Hall of Fame Hogvillian
  • *******
  • Total likes: 83
  • Offline Offline
  • Gender: Male
  • Posts: 6,080
  • I will teach you Italian....the fun way.
Re: Building Arkansas into a powerhouse
« Reply #203 on: January 05, 2019, 05:28:54 pm »

From what I've read, if Arkansas signs all six of the players committed to sign in February, this class will finish #15 in the nation and #6 in the SEC. If Morris and staff keep that kind of recruiting up in the future, the Hogs will start to become consistently competitive in the SEC in a few years.

Stay positive GUV!
Logged

LZH

  • Gold Hogvillian
  • *********
  • Total likes: 960
  • Offline Offline
  • Gender: Male
  • Posts: 22,820
  • Tight but Loose
Re: Building Arkansas into a powerhouse
« Reply #204 on: January 05, 2019, 08:13:32 pm »

738,000 population in LR/NLR!

Maybe 738,000 empty houses and buildings from everyone moving to NWA or Dallas!

It wasn't that long ago that LR's metro population was around 400,000.  It has damn near doubled in 10-15 years. Folks are moving to the suburbs and LR proper is still 200,000....and has been for a long time. Alot of people are scattering to the suburbs and the new families are locating out of the city. It's a shame.
Logged

tusksincolorado

  • Hall of Fame Hogvillian
  • *******
  • Total likes: 83
  • Offline Offline
  • Gender: Male
  • Posts: 6,080
  • I will teach you Italian....the fun way.
Re: Building Arkansas into a powerhouse
« Reply #205 on: January 05, 2019, 09:39:27 pm »

It wasn't that long ago that LR's metro population was around 400,000.  It has damn near doubled in 10-15 years. Folks are moving to the suburbs and LR proper is still 200,000....and has been for a long time. Alot of people are scattering to the suburbs and the new families are locating out of the city. It's a shame.

Could have sworn the last time I crossed over the 430 bridge I saw a sign stating a population of 185,000....but I could be wrong. My wife tells me that I am all the time!
Logged

99toLife

  • Gold Hogvillian
  • *********
  • Total likes: 241
  • Online Online
  • Posts: 16,740
  • Crazy Times Make Crazy people Crazier!!!!
Re: Building Arkansas into a powerhouse
« Reply #206 on: January 05, 2019, 09:42:08 pm »

It wasn't that long ago that LR's metro population was around 400,000.  It has damn near doubled in 10-15 years. Folks are moving to the suburbs and LR proper is still 200,000....and has been for a long time. Alot of people are scattering to the suburbs and the new families are locating out of the city. It's a shame.

It's that way in every city and always has been for the last 50 years.  It's the metro area that makes the city strong.  not the proper as you put it.
Logged

AirWarren

  • Hall of Fame Hogvillian
  • *******
  • Total likes: 1282
  • Offline Offline
  • Gender: Male
  • Posts: 5,579
  • Football impotence of the Midwest
Re: Building Arkansas into a powerhouse
« Reply #207 on: January 05, 2019, 10:07:39 pm »

Do you view these public, or even private charter schools in the same vein as regular school district, or even area wide private school?

Public.

They have to abide by the same rules as set forth by the state. And make their operating funds available to the public as well as present school improvement plans for the year to the ADE.

ALL OF WHICH, private schools do not.
Logged

UnknownNobody

Re: Building Arkansas into a powerhouse
« Reply #208 on: January 05, 2019, 10:31:57 pm »

It's that way in every city and always has been for the last 50 years.  It's the metro area that makes the city strong.  not the proper as you put it.

Wrong as usual. Suburban areas actually detract from cities.

The suburban population comes into a city for their jobs and then runs back to the burbs taking their
Paychecks and tax dollars with them.

The federal and state governments make many of their funding decisions based, to some degree, on population estimates. If the suburbs are where the people are, then the suburbs are where the dollars will flow. If more people are moving to the city, growing the population, then more of our tax dollars pour into public transit, parks, schools, and other services in the urban core.Those are the kind of things that draw large companies like Amazon.

The more services we provide, the more people are apt to show up. It’s a vicious cycle: Population drives the money, money drives the population.

tusksincolorado

  • Hall of Fame Hogvillian
  • *******
  • Total likes: 83
  • Offline Offline
  • Gender: Male
  • Posts: 6,080
  • I will teach you Italian....the fun way.
Re: Building Arkansas into a powerhouse
« Reply #209 on: January 05, 2019, 10:39:10 pm »

Wrong as usual. Suburban areas actually detract from cities.

The suburban population comes into a city for their jobs and then runs back to the burbs taking their
Paychecks and tax dollars with them.

The federal and state governments make many of their funding decisions based, to some degree, on population estimates. If the suburbs are where the people are, then the suburbs are where the dollars will flow. If more people are moving to the city, growing the population, then more of our tax dollars pour into public transit, parks, schools, and other services in the urban core.Those are the kind of things that draw large companies like Amazon.

The more services we provide, the more people are apt to show up. It’s a vicious cycle: Population drives the money, money drives the population.

Someone gets it....

Pigs in Zen

Re: Building Arkansas into a powerhouse
« Reply #210 on: January 05, 2019, 10:46:18 pm »

Someone gets it....

It’s amazing to me that most don’t.

Hogmatic

Re: Building Arkansas into a powerhouse
« Reply #211 on: January 06, 2019, 07:30:02 am »

Wrong as usual. Suburban areas actually detract from cities.

The suburban population comes into a city for their jobs and then runs back to the burbs taking their
Paychecks and tax dollars with them.

The federal and state governments make many of their funding decisions based, to some degree, on population estimates. If the suburbs are where the people are, then the suburbs are where the dollars will flow. If more people are moving to the city, growing the population, then more of our tax dollars pour into public transit, parks, schools, and other services in the urban core.Those are the kind of things that draw large companies like Amazon.

The more services we provide, the more people are apt to show up. It’s a vicious cycle: Population drives the money, money drives the population.

We all should be proud of the River Market area in LR.  More metro areas are creating Economic Development incentive zones in their urban centers because the money drain to the suburbs has left the tax base upside down.  Dilapidation is very expensive to manage and fix, so cities are finding it is worth setting up the incentive zones to attract investment in downtowns.  Look at cities with dilapidated buildings that they can't afford to seize and maintain nor tear down.  Metros have to spend more in crime enforcement in the run down areas because empty structures are hiding places.   Metros also have to spend money on better highways to those same suburbs to alleviate traffic safety issues.

ricepig

Re: Building Arkansas into a powerhouse
« Reply #212 on: January 06, 2019, 08:05:28 am »

Public.

They have to abide by the same rules as set forth by the state. And make their operating funds available to the public as well as present school improvement plans for the year to the ADE.

ALL OF WHICH, private schools do not.

How many of these public chartered schools have the same "taxing" power of a regular school district?
Logged

Sweet Feet

  • Hogvillian
  • ******
  • Total likes: 104
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1,711
  • Surfing the web at Hogville.net
Re: Building Arkansas into a powerhouse
« Reply #213 on: January 06, 2019, 07:48:17 pm »

Cheat, Cheat, and more Cheat.....That's the only way Arkansas will be a powerhouse. Either that or dip for a weaker P5 conference.
Logged

HUNGRYHAWG

Re: Building Arkansas into a powerhouse
« Reply #214 on: January 06, 2019, 08:38:50 pm »

We all should be proud of the River Market area in LR.  More metro areas are creating Economic Development incentive zones in their urban centers because the money drain to the suburbs has left the tax base upside down.  Dilapidation is very expensive to manage and fix, so cities are finding it is worth setting up the incentive zones to attract investment in downtowns.  Look at cities with dilapidated buildings that they can't afford to seize and maintain nor tear down.  Metros have to spend more in crime enforcement in the run down areas because empty structures are hiding places.   Metros also have to spend money on better highways to those same suburbs to alleviate traffic safety issues.

Just wondering if you are talking about opportunity zones?
« Last Edit: January 06, 2019, 09:35:09 pm by HUNGRYHAWG »
Logged

liljo

  • Hogvillian
  • ******
  • Total likes: 910
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1,995
  • Surfing the web at Hogville.net
Re: Building Arkansas into a powerhouse
« Reply #215 on: January 06, 2019, 09:10:00 pm »

Cheat, Cheat, and more Cheat.....That's the only way Arkansas will be a powerhouse. Either that or dip for a weaker P5 conference.
So, you’re saying that if the team does pull off the turnaround—if they do succeed—then you are branding them as cheaters straightaway.

Lame. Pathetically lame. And totally unfair to them if it simply comes through hard work. 

Sweet Feet

  • Hogvillian
  • ******
  • Total likes: 104
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1,711
  • Surfing the web at Hogville.net
Re: Building Arkansas into a powerhouse
« Reply #216 on: January 06, 2019, 09:37:36 pm »

So, you’re saying that if the team does pull off the turnaround—if they do succeed—then you are branding them as cheaters straightaway.

Lame. Pathetically lame. And totally unfair to them if it simply comes through hard work.
Never said that. Quit putting words in my mouth and jumping to conclusion. Truth is a lot of these schools are bending the rules. I don't believe Alabama is just that clean of a program. Same with our past national champs. It's some rules being bent somewhere. Same reason why Ole Miss suddenly became Alabama's nightmare out of nowhere.
Logged

liljo

  • Hogvillian
  • ******
  • Total likes: 910
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1,995
  • Surfing the web at Hogville.net
Re: Building Arkansas into a powerhouse
« Reply #217 on: January 06, 2019, 09:59:33 pm »

Never said that. Quit putting words in my mouth and jumping to conclusion. Truth is a lot of these schools are bending the rules. I don't believe Alabama is just that clean of a program. Same with our past national champs. It's some rules being bent somewhere. Same reason why Ole Miss suddenly became Alabama's nightmare out of nowhere.
Hey man, I QUOTED you.  Read your own quote. You said “the ONLY way...”

Hogmatic

Re: Building Arkansas into a powerhouse
« Reply #218 on: January 07, 2019, 08:36:56 am »

Just wondering if you are talking about opportunity zones?

Yes.  That is another word for it which varies from one region to another. 
Logged

Hogmatic

Re: Building Arkansas into a powerhouse
« Reply #219 on: January 07, 2019, 08:38:01 am »

Cheat, Cheat, and more Cheat.....That's the only way Arkansas will be a powerhouse. Either that or dip for a weaker P5 conference.

We will never cheat at those levels.

LZH

  • Gold Hogvillian
  • *********
  • Total likes: 960
  • Offline Offline
  • Gender: Male
  • Posts: 22,820
  • Tight but Loose
Re: Building Arkansas into a powerhouse
« Reply #220 on: January 07, 2019, 08:39:00 am »

It's that way in every city and always has been for the last 50 years.  It's the metro area that makes the city strong.  not the proper as you put it.

Not sure I "put" it any way. I just made the point that the LR metro area is growing pretty well but the city itself isn't.
Logged

AirWarren

  • Hall of Fame Hogvillian
  • *******
  • Total likes: 1282
  • Offline Offline
  • Gender: Male
  • Posts: 5,579
  • Football impotence of the Midwest
Re: Building Arkansas into a powerhouse
« Reply #221 on: January 07, 2019, 09:54:17 am »

Not sure I "put" it any way. I just made the point that the LR metro area is growing pretty well but the city itself isn't.

It appears Little Rock itself, went from 193,524 in 2010 to 198,606 since the last 2017 count. We will know more next year when 2020 rolls around. Despite it's issues like most cities, LR grew 2.6% in 7 years. Not bad for a city that gets a bad rep like it does. It the current trend continues, the city of LR itself will eclipse the 200K mark in population in the next 7 years.

Take into consideration the surrounding towns that make up the metro area:
Bryant, Arkansas- 20,194(21% growth in 7 years)
Benton, Arkansas- 35,789(16.6% growth in 7 years)
Conway, Arkansas- 65,782(11.7% growth in 7 years)
Cabot, Arkansas- 26,141(9.9% growth in 7 years)
Jacksonville, Arkansas- 28,513(0.5% growth in 7 years)
Maumelle, Arkansas- 18,214(6.1% growth in 7 years)
North Little Rock, Arkansas- 65, 911(5.8% growth in 7 years)
Sherwood, Arkansas- 31,081(5.3% growth in 7 years)

Totals involving the entire metro area that spans 10 counties, giving it a total population of 904,847. If you use the metro area population 734,622. We doing alright down here in the LR metro.
Logged

LZH

  • Gold Hogvillian
  • *********
  • Total likes: 960
  • Offline Offline
  • Gender: Male
  • Posts: 22,820
  • Tight but Loose
Re: Building Arkansas into a powerhouse
« Reply #222 on: January 07, 2019, 11:44:18 am »

It appears Little Rock itself, went from 193,524 in 2010 to 198,606 since the last 2017 count. We will know more next year when 2020 rolls around. Despite it's issues like most cities, LR grew 2.6% in 7 years. Not bad for a city that gets a bad rep like it does. It the current trend continues, the city of LR itself will eclipse the 200K mark in population in the next 7 years.

Take into consideration the surrounding towns that make up the metro area:
Bryant, Arkansas- 20,194(21% growth in 7 years)
Benton, Arkansas- 35,789(16.6% growth in 7 years)
Conway, Arkansas- 65,782(11.7% growth in 7 years)
Cabot, Arkansas- 26,141(9.9% growth in 7 years)
Jacksonville, Arkansas- 28,513(0.5% growth in 7 years)
Maumelle, Arkansas- 18,214(6.1% growth in 7 years)
North Little Rock, Arkansas- 65, 911(5.8% growth in 7 years)
Sherwood, Arkansas- 31,081(5.3% growth in 7 years)

Totals involving the entire metro area that spans 10 counties, giving it a total population of 904,847. If you use the metro area population 734,622. We doing alright down here in the LR metro.


I know I am not a spring chicken anymore, but I can easily remember when Cabot was just a spot in the road and Conway was only about 17,000. Same for Benton and Bryant, where my sister lives.
Logged

bennyl08

  • Gold Hogvillian
  • *********
  • Total likes: 277
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 20,029
  • Ever since the war I've had a drinking problem
Re: Building Arkansas into a powerhouse
« Reply #223 on: January 07, 2019, 11:37:07 pm »

It appears Little Rock itself, went from 193,524 in 2010 to 198,606 since the last 2017 count. We will know more next year when 2020 rolls around. Despite it's issues like most cities, LR grew 2.6% in 7 years. Not bad for a city that gets a bad rep like it does. It the current trend continues, the city of LR itself will eclipse the 200K mark in population in the next 7 years.

Take into consideration the surrounding towns that make up the metro area:
Bryant, Arkansas- 20,194(21% growth in 7 years)
Benton, Arkansas- 35,789(16.6% growth in 7 years)
Conway, Arkansas- 65,782(11.7% growth in 7 years)
Cabot, Arkansas- 26,141(9.9% growth in 7 years)
Jacksonville, Arkansas- 28,513(0.5% growth in 7 years)
Maumelle, Arkansas- 18,214(6.1% growth in 7 years)
North Little Rock, Arkansas- 65, 911(5.8% growth in 7 years)
Sherwood, Arkansas- 31,081(5.3% growth in 7 years)

Totals involving the entire metro area that spans 10 counties, giving it a total population of 904,847. If you use the metro area population 734,622. We doing alright down here in the LR metro.

I've seen places include these cities so don't think that I'm just attacking you or something, but man, a lot of those places are stretches to consider them part of the metro area, IMO. Namely, Conway, Cabot, and Jacksonville.

Looking up the definition of what a metro area is, the disconnect makes sense. The metro area officially consists of essentially two things. An urban conglomeration and outside commuter belts. While I couldn't imagine wanting to commute from say conway to LR, the traffic clearly shows that a lot of people do just that. So, it's undeniably part of the commuter belt. However, I personally think more of the urban conglomeration when thinking about the metro area.

Side note, % growth can be a misleading. You can have one group of 10,000 people add another 2000 people and it's grown by 20%. Another group of 10 people could add just 3 and it's grown by 33%. Adding 2000 people is a harder feat than adding 3. This is a side note because this doesn't counter or add anything useful directly to this conversation. Just a numbers thing to be aware of.
Logged

wachhog

Re: Building Arkansas into a powerhouse
« Reply #224 on: January 07, 2019, 11:48:34 pm »

I had some serious issues with some of our coaching decisions last year....but that was last year. My main concern about Morris and his offense is that SEC defenses have seen similar variations of it for a decade now. Are we late to the party with this RPO offense?
It is entirely possible we are late to the party; we hired a dinasaur in Bret Bielema and kept the fossil for five long years. His brand of football had already expired long before we bought it.

Sweet Feet

  • Hogvillian
  • ******
  • Total likes: 104
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1,711
  • Surfing the web at Hogville.net
Re: Building Arkansas into a powerhouse
« Reply #225 on: January 08, 2019, 02:09:11 am »

Hey man, I QUOTED you.  Read your own quote. You said “the ONLY way...”
Exactly and read yours. Never said i would brand them automatically as cheaters even if they did pull a turn around cleanly.
Logged

Hogmatic

Re: Building Arkansas into a powerhouse
« Reply #226 on: January 08, 2019, 07:54:09 am »

It is entirely possible we are late to the party; we hired a dinasaur in Bret Bielema and kept the fossil for five long years. His brand of football had already expired long before we bought it.

I don't like the prairie dog offense.  I don't like the way it has removed traditional strategy to focus on using tempo to force the defense to make mistakes.   I liked the Pro style that Enos developed and it was unique in a world of prairie dogs.   Very few high schools run that style so it was difficult to recruit to it, and that led to an accelerated failure.

As for being late to the party, the spread has numerous variations and CCM has something much more complex than what AU would run with Nick Marshall or Cam.   CCM appears more than willing to make changes to his offense so I am not concerned about obsolescence.
Logged

AirWarren

  • Hall of Fame Hogvillian
  • *******
  • Total likes: 1282
  • Offline Offline
  • Gender: Male
  • Posts: 5,579
  • Football impotence of the Midwest
Re: Building Arkansas into a powerhouse
« Reply #227 on: January 08, 2019, 08:26:07 am »

I've seen places include these cities so don't think that I'm just attacking you or something, but man, a lot of those places are stretches to consider them part of the metro area, IMO. Namely, Conway, Cabot, and Jacksonville.

Looking up the definition of what a metro area is, the disconnect makes sense. The metro area officially consists of essentially two things. An urban conglomeration and outside commuter belts. While I couldn't imagine wanting to commute from say conway to LR, the traffic clearly shows that a lot of people do just that. So, it's undeniably part of the commuter belt. However, I personally think more of the urban conglomeration when thinking about the metro area.

Side note, % growth can be a misleading. You can have one group of 10,000 people add another 2000 people and it's grown by 20%. Another group of 10 people could add just 3 and it's grown by 33%. Adding 2000 people is a harder feat than adding 3. This is a side note because this doesn't counter or add anything useful directly to this conversation. Just a numbers thing to be aware of.

So you're ok exluding Bentonville out of the NWA Metro area? OR Fayetteville out of the NWA region? What about not including The Woodlands to the Houston Metro area?
According the census bureau, the Little Rock metro area includes the counties of Pulaski, faulkner, grant, lonoke, perry, and saline county.

Conway is 30 miles from Little rock.

Cabot to Little rock is 24 miles.

Fayetteville to Bentonville is 28.2 miles.

The Woodlands to Houston is 29 miles.


Thanks for the math lesson. I get that. But growth is growth. I don’t care if it’s by 50 for 50000. A lot better than seeing negative percentages.
Logged

bennyl08

  • Gold Hogvillian
  • *********
  • Total likes: 277
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 20,029
  • Ever since the war I've had a drinking problem
Re: Building Arkansas into a powerhouse
« Reply #228 on: January 13, 2019, 11:23:27 am »

So you're ok exluding Bentonville out of the NWA Metro area? OR Fayetteville out of the NWA region? What about not including The Woodlands to the Houston Metro area?
According the census bureau, the Little Rock metro area includes the counties of Pulaski, faulkner, grant, lonoke, perry, and saline county.

Conway is 30 miles from Little rock.

Cabot to Little rock is 24 miles.

Fayetteville to Bentonville is 28.2 miles.

The Woodlands to Houston is 29 miles.


Thanks for the math lesson. I get that. But growth is growth. I don’t care if it’s by 50 for 50000. A lot better than seeing negative percentages.

I would argue that there is no single NWA metro area. That would be akin to saying the Southern California metro area. There's a SD metro area, there's a LA metro area, but those two metros are fairly distinct IMO.

I could mostly care less about texas and the houston metro. Never been and the less time of my life in that state, the better.

Miles has nothing to do with it. Sticking with NW Arkansas, there isn't a super obvious boundary b/w Fayetteville and Springdale. Save for the river, Ft Smith and Van Buren would blur together. Bentonville and Rogers blur together.

So for me, I'd say that there are three distinct "metro" areas in the NW region. I'm fine talking about the economics of that region as a whole. And I'm sure there are people who commute all between the different cities. However, for me, a metro region should only be the urban conglomeration aspect while the commuter belt part gets more into regional. Conway is obviously a part of the central Arkansas region. However, it is in no way connected to LR via urban sprawl.

Going back to distances, I'll do you one better. Cabot and Jackson based on google maps are only 10.5 miles apart. However, at least 10 years ago or so, pretty much all 10 of those miles were full of nothing. While I'd consider Sherwood all the way up to Beebee as part of the 67/167 corrider region and people commute all up and down that, you don't need a sign to tell you when you've left one city and entered into another. In contrast, San Fernando and San Bernadino is the LA area are 75 miles apart. However, you can easily drive from one to the next and never leave the concrete jungle. The only way to tell when you've left one and entered the other is by signs. Vs driving down 67/167 you hit Beebee, then nothing, then Cabot, then nothing, then Jacksonville, then nothing, then Sherwood, and from there, you can drive all the way to little rock and never leave the urban environment. Even though Beebee to LR is only half the physical distance as SF to SB in the LA area.

However, as I already said, commuter belts IMO shouldn't be factor in metropolitan areas. If 45 of the 50 miles you drive to go from one city to the next is forests and farms and towns under 1000 population, hard to argue IMO that it's part of the same metro even if half that one town commutes to the other.
Logged

Hogmatic

Re: Building Arkansas into a powerhouse
« Reply #229 on: January 13, 2019, 12:12:13 pm »

I would argue that there is no single NWA metro area. That would be akin to saying the Southern California metro area. There's a SD metro area, there's a LA metro area, but those two metros are fairly distinct IMO.

I could mostly care less about texas and the houston metro. Never been and the less time of my life in that state, the better.

Miles has nothing to do with it. Sticking with NW Arkansas, there isn't a super obvious boundary b/w Fayetteville and Springdale. Save for the river, Ft Smith and Van Buren would blur together. Bentonville and Rogers blur together.

So for me, I'd say that there are three distinct "metro" areas in the NW region. I'm fine talking about the economics of that region as a whole. And I'm sure there are people who commute all between the different cities. However, for me, a metro region should only be the urban conglomeration aspect while the commuter belt part gets more into regional. Conway is obviously a part of the central Arkansas region. However, it is in no way connected to LR via urban sprawl.

Going back to distances, I'll do you one better. Cabot and Jackson based on google maps are only 10.5 miles apart. However, at least 10 years ago or so, pretty much all 10 of those miles were full of nothing. While I'd consider Sherwood all the way up to Beebee as part of the 67/167 corrider region and people commute all up and down that, you don't need a sign to tell you when you've left one city and entered into another. In contrast, San Fernando and San Bernadino is the LA area are 75 miles apart. However, you can easily drive from one to the next and never leave the concrete jungle. The only way to tell when you've left one and entered the other is by signs. Vs driving down 67/167 you hit Beebee, then nothing, then Cabot, then nothing, then Jacksonville, then nothing, then Sherwood, and from there, you can drive all the way to little rock and never leave the urban environment. Even though Beebee to LR is only half the physical distance as SF to SB in the LA area.

However, as I already said, commuter belts IMO shouldn't be factor in metropolitan areas. If 45 of the 50 miles you drive to go from one city to the next is forests and farms and towns under 1000 population, hard to argue IMO that it's part of the same metro even if half that one town commutes to the other.

This is crazy and completely laughable MSA reasoning.  The NWA MSA explanation must be a joke.
Logged

bennyl08

  • Gold Hogvillian
  • *********
  • Total likes: 277
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 20,029
  • Ever since the war I've had a drinking problem
Re: Building Arkansas into a powerhouse
« Reply #230 on: January 13, 2019, 01:15:14 pm »

This is crazy and completely laughable MSA reasoning.  The NWA MSA explanation must be a joke.

Nothing laughable about it.

If I hand you a satellite map and ask for information about different cities. Unless you are already familiar with the towns, you won't know the difference between Bentonville and Rogers. It will simply look like one single urban area. There will then be a completely separate urban area for Spingdale/Fayetteville which will also look like one cohesive urban unit. However, there would be nothing on a map connecting the two together. Hence, they'd be two separate metro regions.

On the other hand, if you are looking at some massive excel spreadsheet with no spatial information, then you have a whole mesh of people living, working, and shopping in this one whole area and act as one cohesive economic unit. In that case, Fayetteville up to Bentonville and probably even Bella Vista all look indistinguishable.

So, if you are wanting to compile economic data, then of course you include Conway in the Little Rock metro area because a lot of workers and shoppers in LR live and commute from Conway and some even vice versa. If you are looking at things from a geospatial data, then it is obvious that the two are very disjoint urban units and should be treated separately.

Put it another way, if I'm making an economic map, that whole area could be considered one block. If I'm plotting an urban vs rural map, it would be outlandish to assume that the region from Conway to Beebee to LR to Benton is one giant urban square and I'd be much better off having small, distinct urban blocks with rural areas in between.
Logged

LZH

  • Gold Hogvillian
  • *********
  • Total likes: 960
  • Offline Offline
  • Gender: Male
  • Posts: 22,820
  • Tight but Loose
Re: Building Arkansas into a powerhouse
« Reply #231 on: January 13, 2019, 01:49:58 pm »

Nothing laughable about it.

If I hand you a satellite map and ask for information about different cities. Unless you are already familiar with the towns, you won't know the difference between Bentonville and Rogers. It will simply look like one single urban area. There will then be a completely separate urban area for Spingdale/Fayetteville which will also look like one cohesive urban unit. However, there would be nothing on a map connecting the two together. Hence, they'd be two separate metro regions.

On the other hand, if you are looking at some massive excel spreadsheet with no spatial information, then you have a whole mesh of people living, working, and shopping in this one whole area and act as one cohesive economic unit. In that case, Fayetteville up to Bentonville and probably even Bella Vista all look indistinguishable.

So, if you are wanting to compile economic data, then of course you include Conway in the Little Rock metro area because a lot of workers and shoppers in LR live and commute from Conway and some even vice versa. If you are looking at things from a geospatial data, then it is obvious that the two are very disjoint urban units and should be treated separately.

Put it another way, if I'm making an economic map, that whole area could be considered one block. If I'm plotting an urban vs rural map, it would be outlandish to assume that the region from Conway to Beebee to LR to Benton is one giant urban square and I'd be much better off having small, distinct urban blocks with rural areas in between.

The Fayetteville/Bentonville metro is similar to Tampa/St. Pete.  It takes both cities to drive the regional economy.  If you include Sarasota and Polk Counties, the Tampa Bay metro area is around 4.5 million.  The fact that the bay itself separates quite a bit of the population doesn't really affect the overall scheme of things.....three ten mile bridges plus the Sunshine Skyway take care of that, as well as all the interlocking towns/communities north of the bay that extend eastward from the Gulf to I-4.

I'd think NWA isn't too different, even if less populated.  You've got your 'north end' and your 'south end' of the MSA.
Logged

99toLife

  • Gold Hogvillian
  • *********
  • Total likes: 241
  • Online Online
  • Posts: 16,740
  • Crazy Times Make Crazy people Crazier!!!!
Re: Building Arkansas into a powerhouse
« Reply #232 on: January 13, 2019, 01:53:10 pm »

The Fayetteville/Bentonville metro is similar to Tampa/St. Pete.  It takes both cities to drive the regional economy.  If you include Sarasota and Polk Counties, the Tampa Bay metro area is around 4.5 million.  The fact that the bay itself separates quite a bit of the population doesn't really affect the overall scheme of things.....three ten mile bridges plus the Sunshine Skyway take care of that, as well as all the interlocking towns/communities north of the bay that extend eastward from the Gulf to I-4.

I'd think NWA isn't too different, even if less populated.  You've got your 'north end' and your 'south end' of the MSA.

Disagree, so much smaller you can't compare in your example. 
Logged

LZH

  • Gold Hogvillian
  • *********
  • Total likes: 960
  • Offline Offline
  • Gender: Male
  • Posts: 22,820
  • Tight but Loose
Re: Building Arkansas into a powerhouse
« Reply #233 on: January 13, 2019, 02:02:03 pm »

Disagree, so much smaller you can't compare in your example. 

I dig it.  I was mostly comparing the two because one wouldn't function as well without the other......sort of a DFW type-deal.  And, the bay between Tampa and St. Pete isn't too different than the country (void?) between Fayetteville/Springdale and Rogers/Bentonville.
Logged

99toLife

  • Gold Hogvillian
  • *********
  • Total likes: 241
  • Online Online
  • Posts: 16,740
  • Crazy Times Make Crazy people Crazier!!!!
Re: Building Arkansas into a powerhouse
« Reply #234 on: January 13, 2019, 02:06:33 pm »

I dig it.  I was mostly comparing the two because one wouldn't function as well without the other......sort of a DFW type-deal.  And, the bay between Tampa and St. Pete isn't too different than the country (void?) between Fayetteville/Springdale and Rogers/Bentonville.

Got it, thanks
Logged

LZH

  • Gold Hogvillian
  • *********
  • Total likes: 960
  • Offline Offline
  • Gender: Male
  • Posts: 22,820
  • Tight but Loose
Re: Building Arkansas into a powerhouse
« Reply #235 on: January 13, 2019, 02:14:56 pm »

Got it, thanks

While we're at it, one of the funniest things I remember seeing was 25-30 years ago when LR was trying to squeeze Pulaski County into annexing LR/NLR into one city.  Then the idea hit that NLR would stay as it was but change the name.  When (and it may still be a hoot to read) the comments/editorial page of the ADG went ape**** and everyone wanted to rename NLR 'Argenta'......one yahoo suggested they keep the "NLR" logos and just call it "Not Little Rock".  Still think that was hilarious.
Logged

DeltaBoy

  • Gold Hogvillian
  • *********
  • Total likes: 608
  • Offline Offline
  • Gender: Male
  • Posts: 71,283
  • I'm Un-Reconstructed. Sic semper tyrannis
Re: Building Arkansas into a powerhouse
« Reply #236 on: January 13, 2019, 05:15:29 pm »

No one in Ark will play Trinity after the beating they gave Shiloh! But I believe Morris can get the Pipeline rebuilt!
Logged

DeltaBoy

  • Gold Hogvillian
  • *********
  • Total likes: 608
  • Offline Offline
  • Gender: Male
  • Posts: 71,283
  • I'm Un-Reconstructed. Sic semper tyrannis
Re: Building Arkansas into a powerhouse
« Reply #237 on: January 13, 2019, 05:21:25 pm »

Also every time you see former Fed Judge Henry Wood grave ....spit or piss on it  cause He screwed up Central Ark Football!

hawgtime

Re: Building Arkansas into a powerhouse
« Reply #238 on: January 13, 2019, 07:02:45 pm »

I know I am not a spring chicken anymore, but I can easily remember when Cabot was just a spot in the road and Conway was only about 17,000. Same for Benton and Bryant, where my sister lives.

I lived in LR until 6th grade when my parents moved to Bryant where I graduated.  It was a very small town ~7k with a school easily as large. the school has exploded and the town is still growing.  Not much real estate between Benton and LR but Bryant has most of it.  The teams are doing well, but I don't think it is a hot bed in football recruiting.

Logged

HogJowler

Re: Building Arkansas into a powerhouse
« Reply #239 on: January 13, 2019, 07:22:15 pm »

Wait, the most awesome amazing greatest class ever is only going to end up AROUND 20th ( so could be anywhere from 23-17 )? An then he is going to top the most awesome amazing greatest class, with one that is MORE awesome, amazing, greatest; and then top that with one that is the mostest ever awesome amazing greatest?  Lots of assuming in there.




By golly I think you finally understand.  Welcome aboard
Logged

Hogmatic

Re: Building Arkansas into a powerhouse
« Reply #240 on: January 14, 2019, 08:27:57 am »

Wrong as usual. Suburban areas actually detract from cities.

The suburban population comes into a city for their jobs and then runs back to the burbs taking their
Paychecks and tax dollars with them.

The federal and state governments make many of their funding decisions based, to some degree, on population estimates. If the suburbs are where the people are, then the suburbs are where the dollars will flow. If more people are moving to the city, growing the population, then more of our tax dollars pour into public transit, parks, schools, and other services in the urban core.Those are the kind of things that draw large companies like Amazon.

The more services we provide, the more people are apt to show up. It’s a vicious cycle: Population drives the money, money drives the population.

This is the correct way to look at the MSA nuances instead of the crazy crap of the last few days on here.
Logged

EastTexasHog

Re: Building Arkansas into a powerhouse
« Reply #241 on: January 18, 2019, 07:35:30 am »

No doubt Morris is on the right track, recruiting elite players given our record tells me these recruits believe he can win.
Logged
Pages: 1 2 3 4 [5]   Go Up
 

KARK
KWNA
Fox 16 Arkansas