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Author Topic: Strange Stories from the SEC Footprint  (Read 56441 times)

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jbcarol

Re: Strange Stories from the SEC Footprint
« Reply #950 on: September 07, 2016, 08:05:21 am »

76 year old former UK Board of Trustees Chairman charged with rape, sodomy

Quote
Billy Joe Miles, a 76-year-old Owensboro businessman, has been charged with first-degree rape and first-degree sodomy, two Class B felonies, each subject to 10 to 20 years in prison. He has also been charged with bribing a witness, a Class D felony subject to one to five years in prison.

    The rape indictment against Miles alleges that on or about July 2, he “engaged in sexual intercourse with another person by forcible compulsion” in Daviess County. It did not identify the other person.

    The sodomy charge alleges that Miles engaged in deviate sexual intercourse.

    The bribery charge contends that on or about July 2, he agreed “to confer a pecuniary benefit upon a person he believed might be called as a witness in an official proceeding with intent to influence the testimony of that person.”

Miles served three terms on the university’s board, among many others around the state. He was UK’s chairman from September 1999 to September 2002 and chairman pro tem from July 2010 to September 2010.
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jbcarol

Re: Strange Stories from the SEC Footprint
« Reply #951 on: September 09, 2016, 07:38:45 am »

Report: Florida State’s opponent Saturday, Charleston Southern, has suspended more than 30 players

Quote
Multiple CSU players announced Thursday that more than 30 players were suspended for using textbook money that the school gave them to buy other school supplies at the campus bookstore...

CSU WR Colton Korn referred to the suspensions as part of a “witch hunt”...

https://twitter.com/AriyaMassoudi/status/774070804015218689

https://twitter.com/AriyaMassoudi/status/774095661247504384

What if the free shoe was on the other foot?

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Rzbakfromwaybak

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Re: Strange Stories from the SEC Footprint
« Reply #952 on: September 09, 2016, 02:49:58 pm »



This is rich.  Bet when Ole Miss see's this, they'll cringe.  If the NCAA suspends 30 players for spending book money on pencils, etc.....what will they do to Ole Miss for all those, more serious infractions ??  Tunsil texting his assistant coach to pay some of his mothers utilitiy bills, etc. ??  If the NCAA doesn't drop the hammer on Ole Miss..... after suspending 30 players over book money.... ???
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Re: Strange Stories from the SEC Footprint
« Reply #953 on: September 09, 2016, 04:11:11 pm »


This is rich.  Bet when Ole Miss see's this, they'll cringe.  If the NCAA suspends 30 players for spending book money on pencils, etc.....what will they do to Ole Miss for all those, more serious infractions ??  Tunsil texting his assistant coach to pay some of his mothers utilitiy bills, etc. ??  If the NCAA doesn't drop the hammer on Ole Miss..... after suspending 30 players over book money.... ???
All things being equal I would totally agree. However, one must consider that poor ole Charleston Southern has no real pull or influence with the NCAA. Therefore, someone like OM, even if they're found guilty of the recruiting violations that they've been accused of, would very likely only receive a minor slap on the wrist. The NCAA can do so and yet "cover their skirts" by pointing to their rough/tough treatment and response to all those "criminals" at CS. Works every time.
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jbcarol

Re: Strange Stories from the SEC Footprint
« Reply #954 on: September 10, 2016, 08:15:11 am »

https://twitter.com/UTPolice/status/774318229435084800

Wes Rucker ‏@wesrucker247 18h18 hours ago

Wes Rucker Retweeted UT Police

Just go knock on the door at every house on frat row. You’ll eventually get your man.

WATE6 – University of Tennessee Police are searching for the person responsible for vandalism at the university’s pride center over the Labor Day weekend.
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jbcarol

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jbcarol

Re: Strange Stories from the SEC Footprint
« Reply #956 on: September 12, 2016, 06:26:55 pm »

https://twitter.com/sbarchenger/status/775423290416463874

Quote
A woman who set two luxury cars on fire in east Nashville last year, severely burning herself in the process, was sentenced to eight years in prison for that incident and a separate shooting.

Chantel Kimble, 22, pleaded guilty in the two incidents in July and December of last year.

Kimble set a 2007 Lexus and 2008 BMW on fire in the 700 block of North 5th Street, near her home in the McFerrin Park area of east Nashville.

After drenching the BMW with gasoline from a can she carried from her house, gas splashed onto her legs and hands leading to second- and third-degree burns, court papers say. She treated the burns herself. Firefighters said at the time it took 45 minutes to put out the inferno.

Five months later, Kimble was charged with trying to kill her ex-boyfriend after she shot him in an arm and the torso outside his home on Briarwick Drive, an arrest affidavit says. The affidavit says Kimble opened fire after they “exchanged words"...
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Re: Strange Stories from the SEC Footprint
« Reply #957 on: September 13, 2016, 12:12:03 am »

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jbcarol

Re: Strange Stories from the SEC Footprint
« Reply #958 on: September 13, 2016, 07:51:36 am »

 Matt Jones ‏@KySportsRadio 13h13 hours ago

Papa John’s apologizes for promo selling pizzas for $9.11 on 9/11 http://bit.ly/2crkUWu  #BBN



Quote
Corporate office in Louisville issued an apology:

    “We sincerely apologize for this extremely insensitive and inappropriate local promo code which was issued by an independent franchisee in Ohio. It was a complete lapse in judgment and does not reflect our values. We have been assured that corrective action was taken by the franchisee and the code will be deactivated.”


At least it’s not as bad as this commercial for a “Twin Tower” sale at a mattress store in Texas:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2ZmM-2gj5Gc
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jbcarol

Re: Strange Stories from the SEC Footprint
« Reply #959 on: September 13, 2016, 08:04:42 am »

-candy]Kentucky football fan attempts to send defensive coordinator DJ Eliot a bag of [CENSORED] candy

Quote
Unfortunately, Jax got the shipping address wrong, listing the old Nutter Training Center instead of the new football training center.

Looks like he screwed that up too.
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jbcarol

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jbcarol

Re: Strange Stories from the SEC Footprint
« Reply #961 on: September 19, 2016, 07:58:57 am »

https://twitter.com/HLpublicsafety/status/777648513530392576

Quote
BATON ROUGE, La.

Baton Rouge police say a man wearing only red underpants attacked officers with “superhuman strength,” got into a patrol car and tried to run over officers and rammed a mobile home off its blocks.

WBRZ-TV reports that according to an arrest report, 35-year-old Jeremy Wayne Saylor punched a beach-ball-sized dent in the car’s windshield, and shook officers off and got into the car despite four shocks from a stun gun.

Police spokesman L'Jean McKneely tells The Advocate that relatives had called police about 4:30 p.m. Saturday, saying Saylor was “tearing things up” after smoking synthetic marijuana called mojo.

He was arrested on charges of attempted murder of a police officer, resisting police, felony auto theft and damage to property.

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jbcarol

Re: Strange Stories from the SEC Footprint
« Reply #963 on: September 19, 2016, 11:33:41 am »

WTVQ: A rash of reports and sightings of suspicious clowns across the country has made its way to London

http://kentuckysportsradio.com/author/tt





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Jamie Hill posted the above picture (top) over the weekend, saying that she saw the clown on the side of the KY 192 as she was driving home from work.

Hill goes on to say that other clowns have been spotted in and around London.

In August, reports of clowns trying to lure children into the woods in South Carolina captured the public eye.  Since then, clowns have been spotted in North Carolina, Georgia, and Alabama.
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jbcarol

Re: Strange Stories from the SEC Footprint
« Reply #964 on: September 19, 2016, 05:44:57 pm »

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jbcarol

Re: Strange Stories from the SEC Footprint
« Reply #965 on: September 20, 2016, 10:37:09 am »

Alabama assistant high school coach is struck by a truck in front of school



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Alma Bryant assistant football coach Scott Meredith was hit by a truck while on traffic duty Tuesday morning outside Alma Bryant High School, Hurricanes coach Bruce Breland confirmed.

Meredith was transported to Singing River Hospital in Pascagoula, Miss. Breland, two of his coaches and Meredith’s wife were at the hospital with Meredith.

Breland said Meredith suffered a broken femur and possibly other injuries in the accident.

“He was directing traffic as is his morning duty,” Breland said. “Someone hit him. We are trying to get an update now. They are testing his hip to see if it was damaged. I’m sure they are doing some other tests as well.”

Breland said the truck did stop after hitting Meredith and that the driver was an adult not a student.

“He is a great football coach,” Breland said. “Every day he comes to work motivated. He demands excellence from the kids. He was going to step away from it this year, but I think he decided he couldn’t live without it. He joked with me that, ‘I guess I’ll take you back.’ I’m sure this will tear him away for the rest of the year, but we’re just praying for his health and recovery right now.”

Meredith is a 1984 graduate of Alba High School.  He attended the University of Alabama where he was a member of the Crimson Tide football team.  He went on to complete his education at Troy State University in 1994. He is certified in Health Education, history and Driver's Education.
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jbcarol

Re: Strange Stories from the SEC Footprint
« Reply #966 on: September 21, 2016, 11:24:58 am »

Vince Ferrara
‏@VinceSports

Per police scanner, clowns bothering people in Knoxville is still a thing.

Rick Nolan ‏@Vol4life75 3h3 hours ago

@VinceSports Are the Gators in town already?
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jbcarol

Re: Strange Stories from the SEC Footprint
« Reply #967 on: September 21, 2016, 11:45:27 am »

WAVE3: 2-headed calf named Lucky born on Adair Co. farm

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An Adair County family received an unexpected surprise recently when a two-headed calf was born at the family farm in Knifley. [Knifley is apparently one of the few places in the US from where you can travel due west to enter Eastern Time Zone from the Central.]

McCubbin said the unusual animal has been eating with both mouths.

They believe she has one brain and sees with the eyes on the sides of her heads.


McCubbin
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jbcarol

Re: Strange Stories from the SEC Footprint
« Reply #968 on: September 22, 2016, 06:11:51 pm »

Stacey Barchenger ‏@sbarchenger 1h1 hour ago

Athens police respond to active shooter situation http://tnne.ws/2dnpDtV 



Quote
The situation at Thomas & Betts Corp. at 260 Dennis St. is now secure, and the suspect is in custody, according to dispatch.

"Shooter is down. Scene is secure," McMinn County Sheriff Joe Guy tweeted...

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jbcarol

Re: Strange Stories from the SEC Footprint
« Reply #969 on: September 22, 2016, 06:14:37 pm »

 Stacey Barchenger ‏@sbarchenger 6h6 hours ago

Nashville teacher charged with recording students taught at another elementary http://tnne.ws/2dmCH2u 



Quote
A Nashville teacher arrested on child porn charges this week also worked part-time at another elementary last school year,  a Metro Nashville Public Schools spokesman said Thursday.

Jarrett Jones, 30, who is accused of recording elementary school girls undressing, worked part-time as a music teacher at Mt. View Elementary school during  the 2015-16 school year while also working part-time at Antioch High School.

Jones was a full-time music teacher at Napier Elementary from the fall of 2011 to 2015. During that period, Metro police say he secretly recorded 40 girls as they changed clothes in a closet in the school's music room.

Metro Schools spokesman Joe Bass said Jones was not rehired by Napier's new principal in 2015 after she was allowed to hire an entirely new staff.

Jones, arrested Monday at his Nashville home, faces two counts of especially aggravated sexual exploitation of minors and three counts of sexual exploitation of minors after Metro police say he admitted Sept. 8 to making the secret recordings at Napier.
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jbcarol

Re: Strange Stories from the SEC Footprint
« Reply #970 on: September 22, 2016, 07:41:50 pm »

https://twitter.com/mayalau/status/778806545769304064

Quote
Joey Bernard of Butt La Rose brought his boat to Denham Springs the Saturday of the flood, August 8. My daughter, Emileigh Searcy who dates Joey, joined him. Most of their efforts focused on the Walker area After a day of rescuing people, they loaded his boat back on the trailer at dark to return home.

While trying to make their way back on I-12, they saw lights and a helicopter in front of them. Inquiring as to what was happening, they were told a deputy sheriff from Pointe Coupee parish in a rescue boat had been sucked under the water of an over pass and thrown from his boat. He was clinging to a tree in the woods.

The helicopter could not reach him and others with boats said the water was too swift for a rescue. They could hear the pleas for help from the officer. My daughter took a Q- beam light and located him in the trees. Joey said he couldn't stand by and watch a man die. He launched his boat off of I-12 and with my daughter holding the light from shore, he made the dash to the officer. He had a broken arm and was clinging to the tree barely above water with the other arm.

Joey reached down in the water and grabbed the officer and pulled him into the boat, safely returning to the road. My daughter who is an RN and a medic secured his arm and placed him a national guard truck that had arrived on scene and transported him out. By that time Joey and Emileigh could not get out of the area so they spent 3 days rescuing people.
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jbcarol

Re: Strange Stories from the SEC Footprint
« Reply #971 on: September 25, 2016, 07:59:36 am »

https://twitter.com/CherylTruman/status/779427014335926272

Quote
The company’s strategy will carry it “on an aggressive growth trajectory into brand-new products categories and markets in the coming years,” including the opening of new retail and distribution centers through the United States and new headquarters in Europe and Asia, Bostock’s statement said.

Big Ass Solutions provided what it called “generous severance packages to all affected employees.”

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jbcarol

Re: Strange Stories from the SEC Footprint
« Reply #972 on: September 25, 2016, 09:13:51 am »

Abhay Aluri ‏@abhay_aluri Sep 23

UGA PARKING SERVICES IS ******* HEARTLESS 😲

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jbcarol

Re: Strange Stories from the SEC Footprint
« Reply #973 on: September 27, 2016, 09:19:16 am »

https://twitter.com/Tennessean/status/780485761590263808

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Jeremy Durham hit a University of Florida fan in the face during the University of Tennessee’s football game Saturday, resulting in the Franklin Republican being escorted out of Neyland Stadium by law enforcement.

There are no official details about what happened, but several witnesses confirmed an officer approached Durham and asked him to leave. The recently expelled lawmaker complied and was escorted out of the stands by a Blount County sheriff's deputy.

Photos and video obtained by The Tennessean verify that Durham was approached by the deputy and others after the hitting incident.

When initially approached by event staff, Durham said, "Did you see what he did? He pushed me. And I pushed his sunglasses off."

A Tennessee fan who saw what happened said Durham was sitting with his wife and state Sen. Brian Kelsey, a longtime friend of Durham. The Tennessee fan said a particularly boisterous Florida fan was yelling loudly, and at one point Durham responded to the yells. The Florida fan started yelling at Durham. Once the Florida fan yelled at Durham, the Tennessee fan said, Durham turned around and hit the man in the face.

"As he hit the guy's face, almost slapped at his face, he caused the guy's glasses to fly off his face. (The glasses) probably went 10 to 12 people down the aisle and one row in front," said the fan, who requested anonymity for fear of retaliation.

The Tennessee fan said the stadium was quiet at the time, thanks to UT's poor performance at the time, so everyone in the area could hear the Florida fan and Durham's confrontation. The Tennessee fan recognized Durham due to ongoing media coverage about his inappropriate behavior with women and Kelsey because he is a state senator.

Kelsey, R-Germantown, said he was uncertain what prompted the deputy's request because he was focused on the football game.

"I didn’t witness anything unusual," Kelsey said, reiterating that he didn't see the altercation. He added, "But it was obvious the officer had asked questions of a Florida fan behind us."

Kelsey said he didn't remember Durham responding to the deputy, but the former lawmaker complied with the request. At the time, Durham's wife, Jessica, who was sitting with them, also left.
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jbcarol

Re: Strange Stories from the SEC Footprint
« Reply #974 on: September 29, 2016, 08:54:58 am »

https://twitter.com/sbarchenger/status/781298948870959104

Quote
Nashville police on Wednesday charged a man, already in jail on domestic violence charges involving his ex-girlfriend, in the rape of an 18-year-old nanny at a park near Percy Priest Lake in early August.

Dennis Naptali Ramos-Montes, a 26-year-old Honduran native, has been charged with felony theft, for stealing the woman's cellphone, and two counts of aggravated rape, according to Nashville police. They say he raped the woman in broad daylight on Aug. 4 while she was caring for 3-year-old twins at the Hamilton Creek Recreation Center off Bell Road.

Metro police detective Chuck Fleming, an eight-year veteran of the department's sex crimes investigation unit, met with the woman to tell her the news on Wednesday.

"I showed her a photo of him, his booking photo, she immediately started shaking and said that’s him," Fleming said. "We all pretty much got emotional at that point. That’s one of the greatest feelings as a detective in the sex crimes unit, you’re able to put a name to a face that she thought she would never know. She always wondered who this person was, where he was."

Fleming said DNA evidence analysis received Wednesday from the Nashville police crime lab confirmed Ramos-Montes was the attacker.

Police had circulated a composite sketch of the suspect after the incident based on the nanny's description. The woman told police the man, a stranger, followed her and the children. She told the children to run away as she was attacked and fought back, losing a tooth in the process, police said.

For nearly eight weeks police have been hunting the suspect.



Fleming met with the nanny in the hospital the day of the incident.

Mascara slid down the woman's face and she paused for minutes at a time as she told Fleming what happened, he recalled. He could only think of one thing.

"To catch him," he said. "To get all the information I could. To start working the case. To get it out to the other detectives, who immediately asked what did I need them to do.

"It doesn’t compare to any other case. I’ve never had a case like this where it was so brazen and out in the open."

Fleming said he worked exclusively on the case for nearly three weeks.

"All the work we put into it, to ID him with good old-fashioned leg work, and then have science back up our leg work, confirm the DNA, it was an overwhelming feeling and I just sobbed," the detective said.

"This is probably one of the best case outcomes that I’ve had in my career as far as I got to give closure not just to her and her family, but the twins’ family."
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jbcarol

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jbcarol

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jbcarol

Re: Strange Stories from the SEC Footprint
« Reply #977 on: October 02, 2016, 09:58:48 am »

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jbcarol

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jbcarol

Re: Strange Stories from the SEC Footprint
« Reply #979 on: October 06, 2016, 08:20:49 am »

https://twitter.com/DrewChamplin/status/783694925690916864

Joseph Goodman ‏@JoeGoodmanJr 20h20 hours ago

Joseph Goodman Retweeted Drew Champlin

This is tragic. Former UAB basketball star dies in Macedonia during training. Dunked the ball, ran down the court and collapsed.
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jbcarol

Re: Strange Stories from the SEC Footprint
« Reply #980 on: October 06, 2016, 05:40:58 pm »

https://twitter.com/sbarchenger/status/784078577419583489

Quote
Six soldiers and two civilians were indicted this week on charges they conspired to steal and sell Army equipment, from printer ink to machine gun parts and the sight for a grenade launcher, on eBay.

Soldiers Michael Barlow, 29; Jonathan Wolford, 28; Kyle Heade, 29; Alexander Hollibaugh, 25; Dustin Nelson, 22; and Aaron Warner, 24, all stationed at Fort Campbell, were named in the indictment unsealed Thursday. Also charged were civilians John Roberts, 26, and Cory Wilson, 42, both of Clarksville.

U.S. Attorney for the Middle District of Tennessee David Rivera announced the charges Thursday during a news conference at the federal courthouse in downtown Nashville.

According to the indictment, the eight men "sold certain U.S. Army equipment that is never offered for sale by the U.S. Department of Defense as surplus" starting in 2013.

Some was restricted equipment sold to buyers in foreign nations.
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jbcarol

Re: Strange Headlines from the SEC Footprint
« Reply #981 on: October 07, 2016, 08:17:04 am »

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jbcarol

Re: Strange Stories from the SEC Footprint
« Reply #982 on: October 07, 2016, 08:22:36 am »

https://twitter.com/vanillaice/status/784033789555122176


Lizzie O'Leary Verified account
‏@lizzieohreally

Lizzie O'Leary Retweeted Vanilla Ice

Stop.
Evacuate and listen.
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jbcarol

Re: Strange Stories from the SEC Footprint
« Reply #983 on: October 08, 2016, 07:44:29 am »

https://twitter.com/sbarchenger/status/784472719404433408

Quote
One of the six Fort Campbell soldiers accused this week of stealing and selling Army equipment overseas was charged with attempted homicide earlier this year.

Kyle Thomas Heade, 29, was charged Jan. 26 with attempted homicide after a shooting at Bojangles on Tiny Town Road in Clarksville.

Heade fired into a car in the parking lot while two men were trying to rob Theresa Cobb, 30, according to police. One of the men in the car, Timothy Grant, was hit five times. Grant was treated at Vanderbilt University Medical Center and survived his injuries.

In the federal indictment unsealed this week, Heade was listed as one of eight men who conspired to steal Army equipment, list it on sites such as eBay and sell it to buyers overseas. In that case, he faces up to five years in prison and a maximum fine of $250,000...
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jbcarol

Re: Strange Stories from the SEC Footprint
« Reply #984 on: October 15, 2016, 10:23:56 pm »

https://twitter.com/sbarchenger/status/786971383511277568

Quote
Vanderbilt University Medical Center owes a former patient $2 million for losing an organ while supposedly testing it for cancer, a Nashville jury ruled Thursday.

"She never had an answer to the question of, 'Do I have cancer or not?' And that’s a worrisome thing to live with," said Randall Kinnard, a Nashville lawyer who represented the patient.

A Vanderbilt spokesman says the university and hospital are considering an appeal of the verdict, which came after a three-day trial. The jury said Vanderbilt violated standards of care and that harmed the patient, according to court documents.

In May 2011, Patricia Greene Gayden had two thyroid nodules biopsied at Vanderbilt's medical center, according to the lawsuit, and doctors recommended further testing because of indeterminate results. The thyroid gland releases hormones that control metabolism and aid organ function, according to the American Thyroid Association.

A month later and concerned about cancer, court documents say Vanderbilt doctors removed the thyroid gland.

Then, they told the woman they lost it, and because of that, they couldn't rule out cancer.
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jbcarol

Re: Strange Stories from the SEC Footprint
« Reply #985 on: October 17, 2016, 10:19:33 am »

https://twitter.com/sbarchenger/status/788027834002530304

Quote
Nashville jury handed Sumner County schools a victory Friday, ruling that staffers at a high school were not at fault in a bullying lawsuit brought by a former standout basketball player there.

Arnett and Sherry Hayes sued the Sumner County Board of Education, saying the district was responsible for allowing their daughter Anastasia to be bullied because of her race. Anastasia Hayes, who is African-American and testified during trial, said older, white teammates at Hendersonville High School used racial epithets toward her and physically harmed her during practices.

But the jury's Friday verdict, which came after about two hours of deliberation, found no evidence of bullying nor prejudice in the district or school, according to Todd Presnell, a lawyer who represented the school.

"The message is that the Sumner County school system has a robust anti-bullying, anti-discrimination policy that they enforce," he said. "The jury's verdict validates that, and we're happy with that."

Anastasia Hayes, now a senior at Riverdale High School, has been a starter for the Lady Warriors since she and her family moved to Murfreesboro before her sophomore year.

The 5-foot-7 point guard has committed to Tennessee and is the No. 9-rated prospect in the country, according to HoopGurlz.
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jbcarol

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jbcarol

Re: Strange Stories from the SEC Footprint
« Reply #987 on: October 18, 2016, 12:37:13 pm »

https://twitter.com/sbarchenger/status/788369364156239875

Quote
MURFREESBORO — The court should consider Sheriff Robert Arnold's memory loss of a reported Labor Day domestic assault of his wife in returning his JailCigs pretrial release, his attorney asserted.

A motion filed recently by Arnold's Nashville lawyer Tom Dundon included documents and sworn affidavits suggesting memory loss occurred after the sheriff drank alcohol and took an Ambien sleeping pill before the Labor Day incident at his home.

The motion also included a statement from Rutherford County Sheriff's Office spokesperson Lisa Marchesoni about why her boss was unable to provide a sufficient recollection of what happened on Labor Day to the federal court's pretrial services in Nashville.

"I recall that after Sheriff Arnold attended a meeting at the U.S. Probation and Pretrial Services Office on Sept. 7, 2016, he returned and told me he had been asked about an incident at his home on Labor Day, and had no recollection of that incident," Marchesoni said in a sworn affidavit.

The Rutherford County sheriff is locked up at this time at the Grayson County, Ky., jail awaiting a jury trial scheduled to start Feb. 7 in Nashville. Arnold, his uncle John Vanderveer and Joe Russell, the Rutherford County Sheriff's Office accounting chief, face a 13-count federal indictment of illegally profiting from the inmates the sheriff oversees in Murfreesboro through the sale of JailCigs, an electronic cigarettes business.
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jbcarol

Re: Strange Stories from the SEC Footprint
« Reply #988 on: October 20, 2016, 09:16:56 am »

https://twitter.com/WDRBNews/status/788866064318857216

Quote
...he noticed scratches on his vehicle.

As he drove to work, he heard noises under his hood.

Armadillos are not native to southern Kentucky nor should they be.
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jbcarol

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jbcarol

Re: Strange Stories from the SEC Footprint
« Reply #990 on: October 20, 2016, 12:03:25 pm »

https://twitter.com/DanielPaulling/status/789130747210821632

Quote
Multiple breakdowns in Alcorn State’s process for certifying the eligibility of its athletes led to 28 ineligible players participating in 11 sports over the 2011-12 to 2014-15 academic years, the Division I Committee on Infractions announced Wednesday morning.

The committee charged Alcorn State with two Level II (the second-most serious on a scale from Level I to Level IV) violations, which were improper certification of eligibility and a failure to monitor. The case overall was considered a Level II-Standard, one of the lowest levels.

Alcorn State proposed a two-year probationary period that started Wednesday, which the committee accepted before adding the school must vacate any wins ineligible athletes participated in, pay a $5,000 fine that will go toward compliance education and receive a public reprimand and censure.

The football team will vacate 13 wins from the 2012 and 2013 seasons; the men’s basketball team will lose 33 wins from the 2011-14 seasons; and the baseball team will lose 43 wins from the 2013-15 seasons.

The men’s and women’s cross country, men's and women's tennis, men's outdoor track and field, volleyball, softball and soccer teams will also have to vacate wins.

The school improperly certified the involved athletes as eligible in regards to NCAA progress-toward-degree legislation, which requires athletes to complete certain amounts of their majors throughout their academic careers in order to remain eligible.

The involved athletes were deemed eligible because of a process “plagued by institutional staff members who made false assumptions and had a lack of awareness and understanding of the steps in the certification process,” the committee wrote in its report.

One of the Vandy confessed rapists is apparently good to go.
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jbcarol

Re: Strange Stories from the SEC Footprint
« Reply #991 on: October 21, 2016, 07:52:52 am »

http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/commercialappeal/obituary.aspx?n=james-louis-herbers&pid=182006145

James Louis Herbers, 50, was called home to be with the Lord, October 15th, 2016. He suffered a cardiac arrest at his home...

...Lastly, the Tennessee Volunteers lost one of their biggest fans, even though they may have contributed to the cardiac arrest!
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jbcarol

Re: Strange Stories from the SEC Footprint
« Reply #992 on: October 21, 2016, 09:15:34 am »

https://twitter.com/sbarchenger/status/789449965839888384

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Proposal could finally cut Opry, Elvis from fifth-grade topics

Tennessee fifth-graders would no longer be required to learn about the birth of country music in East Tennessee, the establishment of iconic institutions like WSM and the Grand Ole Opry in Nashville or the rise of Elvis Presley and Sun Studios in Memphis, under proposed changes to statewide education standards that are now drawing fire from tourism leaders.

The draft changes from the state's standards review committee would by no means eliminate Tennessee music from the curriculum. They would, for instance, mandate that third-graders get more of an overview of the subject. High school history classes would include references to many Tennessee music institutions, and several elective classes would drill down into the minutiae of state music history.

Though moving to slash current requirements for fifth-grade students, the state Board of Education maintains the planned standards, slated to take effect in 2019, would give local school districts leeway to better incorporate more tailored elements of the state’s music history into their social studies classes. The proposed changes must be approved by the Board of Education.

Critics are questioning the proposed standards, arguing that Tennessee students need to learn more about impact of music on the state’s history, not less. With music increasingly tied to Tennessee’s economic development and tourism strategies, the cultural significance of music history in the Volunteer State has never been more important...
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jbcarol

Re: Strange Stories from the SEC Footprint
« Reply #993 on: October 21, 2016, 09:39:01 am »

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jbcarol

Re: Strange Stories from the SEC Footprint
« Reply #994 on: October 23, 2016, 08:24:22 am »

https://twitter.com/sbarchenger/status/789927905296080898



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Gianna Alvarez isn't a fan of birds, so you can imagine her reaction when she pulled up to Hogan's Irish Bar in Cape Canaveral and was met by an emu Friday night.

"I'm scared of birds in general," Alvarez said. "So when I saw it I was just freaking out. I stayed inside the car."

The pet emu – named Taco and owned by Paul Eaton of Cape Canaveral – had been spooked by a stray dog and hopped its 4-foot fence on nearby Lincoln Street sometime around 8:30 p.m.

A Brevard County Animal Control officer and deputies from the Brevard County Sheriff's Office were called to snare the elusive Taco. It took more than an hour, witnesses said.

"It's like catching a giant chicken," said Cpl. David Jacobs...
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jbcarol

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jbcarol

« Last Edit: October 26, 2016, 08:21:27 am by jbcarol »
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jbcarol

Re: Strange Stories from the SEC Footprint
« Reply #998 on: October 26, 2016, 08:18:17 am »

https://twitter.com/wardreporter/status/789932838707728384

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From the perspective of onlookers and many who later watched the video, the baptism was an uplifting display. One comment on Facebook read, “This so so (sic) wonderful! Such a touching and heart warming (sic) video. They are so blessed to have him as Coach. Made me cry alligator tears this morning.”

But was it unconstitutional as a violation of the separation of church and state?

Freedom From Religion Foundation attorney Sam Grover said it was in a letter addressed to Newton Municipal School District Superintendent Virginia Young.

The Freedom From Religion Foundation is asking for assurances from the district that this won’t happen again.

“When a school’s football coach organizes and leads a baptism with his players, students on the team will perceive the religious ritual to be unequivocally endorsed by their school. This appearance of school sponsorship of a religious message violates the Establishment Clause of the First Amendment,” Grover wrote.

Federal courts have ruled that school-sponsored events, including events taking place outside of the classroom and after normal school hours, are subject to the Establishment Clause. The Supreme Court ruled in 2000 in Santa Fe Indep. Sch. Dist. v. Doe, for example, that school-organized prayer at football games was unconstitutional, even when the prayers were led by students.

In a statement to The Clarion-Ledger, Young maintained support of Smith because the baptism was performed away from the school and it was voluntary. Smith told The Clarion-Ledger that he made it clear to players that they did not have to attend the event. He also said he took what he believed were other necessary steps in making sure the baptism was not done on school grounds and occurred after practice.

“The baptism of a Newton Municipal School District student did not occur on school property and did not occur during school hours or during any organized school activity, thus the district feels this is a private matter of choice for that student,” Young said in the statement. “Any additional Newton Municipal School District students that attended the baptism did so as their own voluntary act and decision.”

Grover said those factors do not matter.

“The coach organized this event, he promoted it to his team and all of that was done in his capacity as a coach,” Grover said. “He cannot be promoting his personal religious beliefs to student-players on that team. He only has access to these student players because of his position as a public school representative. He is abusing that privilege.”
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jbcarol

Re: Strange Stories from the SEC Footprint
« Reply #999 on: October 27, 2016, 08:08:56 am »

https://twitter.com/sbarchenger/status/791349076545642496

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The widely covered blues and country standard was first licensed by Bo Carter in 1929, according to some scholars and the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (ASCAP) copyright database. Yet over the years, Carter's stake to the song blurred with each new variation. And now, a relative of the late bluesman is taking the matter to court to give credit to Carter — and secure millions of dollars in royalties for his estate.

"I didn't realize how important it was until I started looking at it the last couple of years," said Miles Floyd, Carter's stepgrandson, who filed the lawsuit. "This song is a well-known song. I was really surprised."

The lawsuit, filed in federal court in Nashville, alleges musician Eric Clapton attributed the song to the wrong songwriter, Huddie Ledbetter (better known as Lead Belly), in his 2013 re-release of his "Unplugged" album. It seeks more than $5 million from a slate of songwriters, publishers and broadcasters for receiving the royalties and failing to give Carter proper credit.

Carter, whose name was Armenter Chatmon, died in Memphis in 1964. Buried in Mississippi, there have been fundraisers as recently as this month to put a headstone on his gravesite. His estate has now passed on to Floyd, a truck driver living in Jackson, Miss.

The call-and-response song "Corrine, Corrina" was written by Carter before 1928 and was copyrighted and released in 1929, according to the lawsuit. It was later recorded by musicians such as Dean Martin, Big Joe Turner, Taj Mahal, Jerry Lee Lewis, Merle Haggard, Willie Nelson and others.
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