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  • #101 by 3kgthog on 05 Jun 2018
  • The UA has already accepted some risk by allowing him to participate in a few activities. Where does this fear of a lawsuit line get drawn? He could just as easily have a fatal episode in one of these mysterious activities heís allowed to take part in.

    I think the slow play with KG can all be explained with two words: Garrett Uekman.
  • #102 by Porked Tongue on 05 Jun 2018
  • Can someone tell me the actual different in 5% and 95%?
    90%
    • Porked Tongue
  • #103 by mbgrulz on 06 Jun 2018
  • The UA has already accepted some risk by allowing him to participate in a few activities. Where does this fear of a lawsuit line get drawn? He could just as easily have a fatal episode in one of these mysterious activities heís allowed to take part in.

    I think the slow play with KG can all be explained with two words: Garrett Uekman.
    Thatís a good one with Garrett U. I had forgotten about that, unfortunately. It all depends on the diagnosis and whatís really wrong with his heart. There are many things that can be wrong with the heart. On one hand, the amount of time that has gone by makes it seem like he wonít get cleared...on the other hand, wouldnít they have gotten him off of scholarship by now if there was no hope of getting cleared?
  • #104 by urkillnmesmalls on 06 Jun 2018
  • Thatís a good one with Garrett U. I had forgotten about that, unfortunately. It all depends on the diagnosis and whatís really wrong with his heart. There are many things that can be wrong with the heart. On one hand, the amount of time that has gone by makes it seem like he wonít get cleared...on the other hand, wouldnít they have gotten him off of scholarship by now if there was no hope of getting cleared?

    The exposure from pulling a scholly for that would probably be very detrimental to the school, and certainly not worth the negative exposure it would bring with it.  I'd be willing to bet that even if he's pulled from the roster, he won't pay for a penny of his UA education.  I have no issue with that...it's the right thing to do if he can't play. 
  • #105 by NoogaHog on 06 Jun 2018
  • The exposure from pulling a scholly for that would probably be very detrimental to the school, and certainly not worth the negative exposure it would bring with it.  I'd be willing to bet that even if he's pulled from the roster, he won't pay for a penny of his UA education.  I have no issue with that...it's the right thing to do if he can't play.

    I'm sure that would happen if he is unable to play. I'm sure he would be able to keep his scholly, the same deal as Rawleigh Williams.
  • #106 by redneckfriend on 06 Jun 2018
  • Thatís a good one with Garrett U. I had forgotten about that, unfortunately. It all depends on the diagnosis and whatís really wrong with his heart. There are many things that can be wrong with the heart. On one hand, the amount of time that has gone by makes it seem like he wonít get cleared...on the other hand, wouldnít they have gotten him off of scholarship by now if there was no hope of getting cleared?

    You are correct. If he had a structural abnormality of his heart identified by echocardiogram (the most likely being hypertrophic cardiomyopathy- essentially a genetic weakness of heart muscle cells (myocytes) resulting in compensatory hypertrophy of the heart) one would expect that he would never be allowed to play or practice due to the well known possibility of sudden death from ventricular arrhythmia. There are no "waivers" or any other assumption of risk actions he or his family could take that would immunize the U of A from lawsuits so it would be, I assume, from a legal standpoint, adios (although they might well let him keep his scholarship as an act of good faith). They might not be sure, even if the echo shows an enlarged heart, that they are dealing with hypertrophic CM (there can be other reasons for the echo appearance) but a heart biopsy would settle that question and I expect Garland and his family would demand one if there was any doubt.

    That hasn't happened (i.e. he is still allowed to practice) and that "suggests" the problem is something more ambiguous and they are waiting to see what the effect of time and/or treatment is on the situation. If that is so the more probable thing is that they have identified an isolated "arrhythmia" (abnormal electrical activity) not associated with a clear cut diagnosis or cause and don't really know its significance as far as risk. They may believe it is benign but they will need nearly absolute proof (which will be almost impossible to obtain) before they can take the chance. His activities may reflect the fact that whatever time or treatment has revealed seems to be an improvement. Still, given the stakes if anything happened, the level of certainty they will require to let him play seems a nearly insurmountable barrier. He might come back- I wouldn't count on it.


    I guess he went to Mayo earlier for a further opinion and that doesn't seem to have changed the basic conclusion- they just don't seem to have full confidence that he is completely safe if he goes full out. The school doesn't want him to die on the court and they don't want to be responsible for the costs and loss of reputation if he did.
  • #107 by Rock City Razorback on 07 Jun 2018
  • Like others have mentioned, there still appears to be some hope considering he hasn't yet been put on medical hardship. I just think it's a slim to none chance and don't see it happening, as bad as everyone involved (none more so than Khalil and his family) wants it to. And that might be the best thing, honestly. Maybe not for the program, but I've read too many articles of kids collapsing right there on the court and passing away. Nothing is worth that, even playing the game you love. Khalil does seem to have his head squarely on his shoulders, and comes from a supportive family. I have confidence that even if he never suits up for the Hogs, he'll take advantage of the other opportunities and be successful. Nevertheless, fingers crossed for Mr. Garland!
  • #108 by FineAsSwine on 07 Jun 2018
  • It may not look good that he isn't cleared yet but he also hasn't been ruled out yet either. If the staff has known for some time now that he won't be able to play, why slow play it? Seems like they would have just broken the news and recruited a replacement.


    To me, that signals that there is still a chance for good news.
  • #109 by The_Bionic_Pig on 07 Jun 2018
  • The exposure from pulling a scholly for that would probably be very detrimental to the school, and certainly not worth the negative exposure it would bring with it.  I'd be willing to bet that even if he's pulled from the roster, he won't pay for a penny of his UA education.  I have no issue with that...it's the right thing to do if he can't play. 

    Medical Hardship doesn't take away the Universities financial commitment to a student-athlete I believe but it does free up a scholarship....
  • #110 by KlubhouseKonnected on 07 Jun 2018
  • Medical Hardship doesn't take away the Universities financial commitment to a student-athlete I believe but it does free up a scholarship....

    Correct.
  • #111 by urkillnmesmalls on 08 Jun 2018
  • Medical Hardship doesn't take away the Universities financial commitment to a student-athlete I believe but it does free up a scholarship....

    I figured there was some provision for that.  I wish nothing but the best for him however it plays out. 
  • #112 by sadhogfan on 08 Jun 2018
  • You are correct. If he had a structural abnormality of his heart identified by echocardiogram (the most likely being hypertrophic cardiomyopathy- essentially a genetic weakness of heart muscle cells (myocytes) resulting in compensatory hypertrophy of the heart) one would expect that he would never be allowed to play or practice due to the well known possibility of sudden death from ventricular arrhythmia. There are no "waivers" or any other assumption of risk actions he or his family could take that would immunize the U of A from lawsuits so it would be, I assume, from a legal standpoint, adios (although they might well let him keep his scholarship as an act of good faith). They might not be sure, even if the echo shows an enlarged heart, that they are dealing with hypertrophic CM (there can be other reasons for the echo appearance) but a heart biopsy would settle that question and I expect Garland and his family would demand one if there was any doubt.

    That hasn't happened (i.e. he is still allowed to practice) and that "suggests" the problem is something more ambiguous and they are waiting to see what the effect of time and/or treatment is on the situation. If that is so the more probable thing is that they have identified an isolated "arrhythmia" (abnormal electrical activity) not associated with a clear cut diagnosis or cause and don't really know its significance as far as risk. They may believe it is benign but they will need nearly absolute proof (which will be almost impossible to obtain) before they can take the chance. His activities may reflect the fact that whatever time or treatment has revealed seems to be an improvement. Still, given the stakes if anything happened, the level of certainty they will require to let him play seems a nearly insurmountable barrier. He might come back- I wouldn't count on it.


    I guess he went to Mayo earlier for a further opinion and that doesn't seem to have changed the basic conclusion- they just don't seem to have full confidence that he is completely safe if he goes full out. The school doesn't want him to die on the court and they don't want to be responsible for the costs and loss of reputation if he did.

    Anyone else find it ironic that this (highly articulate) post was written by "redneckfriend"?
  • #113 by gmarv54 on 09 Jun 2018
  • Anyone else find it ironic that this (highly articulate) post was written by "redneckfriend"?
    I don't,after all it's at a place called hogville. ;D ;D
  • #114 by BannerMountainMan on 10 Jun 2018
  • Anyone else find it ironic that this (highly articulate) post was written by "redneckfriend"?
    i think itís weird that sad Hog fan is the one that thinks itís ironic
  • #115 by Arthur pigby sellers. on 11 Jun 2018
  • I think itís really strange that a legal document canít be made that allows the player to play in games as long as he assumes the risk that goes along with it. Itís obvious that this is not a cut and dry case or he would have been given a medical waver months ago.  He has been allowed to practice with the team and if he wants to play then let him as long as he fully understand the risks and the university is not held liable in the case of adverse events.
  • #116 by PonderinHog on 11 Jun 2018
  • I think itís really strange that a legal document canít be made that allows the player to play in games as long as he assumes the risk that goes along with it. Itís obvious that this is not a cut and dry case or he would have been given a medical waver months ago.  He has been allowed to practice with the team and if he wants to play then let him as long as he fully understand the risks and the university is not held liable in the case of adverse events.
    Yeah, but the optics could be really bad. 
  • #117 by urkillnmesmalls on 12 Jun 2018
  • I think itís really strange that a legal document canít be made that allows the player to play in games as long as he assumes the risk that goes along with it. Itís obvious that this is not a cut and dry case or he would have been given a medical waver months ago.  He has been allowed to practice with the team and if he wants to play then let him as long as he fully understand the risks and the university is not held liable in the case of adverse events.

    Imagine you're Mike Anderson though.  Midway through the second half, he collapses and they can't revive him.  "Man, if I had just taken him out for a short rest a minute ago, he might still be alive." 

    I just don't see how the University would want the visibility of having something happen unless it is a complete anomaly.  With a known issue, this doesn't fit that scenario, UNLESS he's cleared medically to have very limited, or no more risk than a player without any known issues, it seems unlikely that the UA would risk it. 

    What's the first thing you think of when someone talks about a player collapsing?  Hank Gathers, Loyola Maramount.  EVERYONE knows that name and the circumstances around it, and the left handed tribute free throws by his best friend Bo Kimble in the NCAA tournament.  I doubt VERY SERIOUSLY that the UA wants to be thought of in the same regard, even if it's a small percentage chance.   
  • #118 by rude1 on 12 Jun 2018
  • I think itís really strange that a legal document canít be made that allows the player to play in games as long as he assumes the risk that goes along with it. Itís obvious that this is not a cut and dry case or he would have been given a medical waver months ago.  He has been allowed to practice with the team and if he wants to play then let him as long as he fully understand the risks and the university is not held liable in the case of adverse events.
    Liability would be the least of the program's worry if they were to do something this dumb. They would pay dearly even if it doesn't  come from a lawsuit.  Exploiting a player's and his family desire to play, resulting in his death would lead to the worse national exposure you have seen, and hiding behind that signed document would only make it worse. All programs would be hurt dearly when they have to go in other kids living room and explain how you will care for their child if they sign with you.
  • #119 by Hawg Red on 13 Jun 2018
  • I think itís really strange that a legal document canít be made that allows the player to play in games as long as he assumes the risk that goes along with it. Itís obvious that this is not a cut and dry case or he would have been given a medical waver months ago.  He has been allowed to practice with the team and if he wants to play then let him as long as he fully understand the risks and the university is not held liable in the case of adverse events.

    It's not strange at all. What is strange to me is that people don't get why that isn't an option and won't be at any university.
  • #120 by rotaryDial on 13 Jun 2018
  • Liability would be the least of the program's worry if they were to do something this dumb. They would pay dearly even if it doesn't  come from a lawsuit.  Exploiting a player's and his family desire to play, resulting in his death would lead to the worse national exposure you have seen, and hiding behind that signed document would only make it worse. All programs would be hurt dearly when they have to go in other kids living room and explain how you will care for their child if they sign with you.

    100% correct, liability and risk go way beyond money, but it's even more simple then that.   We are talking about the life of a human being.  Our society has become numb to the loss of human life, it's heartbreaking.  What is even more disappointing is the fans on here encouraging it.  For what? Entertainment or a chance to win a GAME??? You are encouraging the risk of human life for your entertainment, for your happiness?  It's a very sad day when our fan base has become this selfish.  If it was your son, and his Dr said there was a good chance he would die playing the game, would you still encourage it?  Oh Lord, I would hope not.  SMH, wake up razorback fans, you are better than this.
  • #121 by logic on 16 Jun 2018
  • I think itís really strange that a legal document canít be made that allows the player to play in games as long as he assumes the risk that goes along with it. Itís obvious that this is not a cut and dry case or he would have been given a medical waver months ago.  He has been allowed to practice with the team and if he wants to play then let him as long as he fully understand the risks and the university is not held liable in the case of adverse events.
    No doubt that is possible. Besides a possible lawsuit is not a problem. Anyone can file a lawsuit for any reason and the UofA would get it dismissed.  The problems are, if he was to die, the media would be hounding the UofA 24/7 and the NCAA might use that to invent an excuse for another 4 year investigation that opposing coaches would use to harm recruiting.
  • #122 by Arthur pigby sellers. on 16 Jun 2018
  • Yeah you guys are probably right about that.
  • #123 by hoglady on 16 Jun 2018
  • Does anyone really want this kid to risk his life playing basketball for Arkansas?
    I'm not interested in watching another Hank Gathers die - one in a lifetime in enough.
    What a waste of a young life that was - many of these kids don't know it yet but they can be so much more than basketball players.
  • #124 by thebignasty on 16 Jun 2018
  • Does anyone really want this kid to risk his life playing basketball for Arkansas?
    I'm not interested in watching another Hank Gathers die - one in a lifetime in enough.
    What a waste of a young life that was - many of these kids don't know it yet but they can be so much more than basketball players.

    Its easy to speculate about whether or not there is a way for the kid to sign a waiver and play on a message board, but I'm with you- if there is some kind of condition that puts someone at an elevated risk to drop dead while playing, I just can't see any way that it makes any sense to take that risk for basketball.
  • #125 by King Kong on 16 Jun 2018
  • Does anyone really want this kid to risk his life playing basketball for Arkansas?
    I'm not interested in watching another Hank Gathers die - one in a lifetime in enough.
    What a waste of a young life that was - many of these kids don't know it yet but they can be so much more than basketball players.

    Alittle extreme considering most everything is speculation at this point
  • #126 by hoglady on 16 Jun 2018
  • Alittle extreme considering most everything is speculation at this point

    I don't think it's extreme - the kid has been sitting out a year due to an apparent heart issue.
    The discussion was about waivers in case he keeled over dead while playing basketball.
    That's about as serious as it gets.
  • #127 by King Kong on 16 Jun 2018
  • I don't think it's extreme - the kid has been sitting out a year due to an apparent heart issue.
    The discussion was about waivers in case he keeled over dead while playing basketball.
    That's about as serious as it gets.

    We have no confirmation of the issue or the risks. Comparing to a tragedy that maybe a different situation seems unfair IMO. Especially considering at the moment he and the coaching staff havenít publicly ruled his return as unlikely.

    In addition Gathers issues although tragic was most likely preventable if he had continued his medication on game days.
  • #128 by Letsroll1200 on 17 Jun 2018
  • I don't think it's extreme - the kid has been sitting out a year due to an apparent heart issue.
    The discussion was about waivers in case he keeled over dead while playing basketball.
    That's about as serious as it gets.

    If it's a slight risk this can happen. I hate it but he shouldn't be allowed to play.
  • #129 by hoglady on 18 Jun 2018
  • We have no confirmation of the issue or the risks. Comparing to a tragedy that maybe a different situation seems unfair IMO. Especially considering at the moment he and the coaching staff haven’t publicly ruled his return as unlikely.

    In addition Gathers issues although tragic was most likely preventable if he had continued his medication on game days.

    And the reason Gathers didn't take his medication was it drastically affected his ability to play basketball.

    So Gathers lost his life and his mother sued the school, the athletic trainer, the AD, the head coach and the cardiologist. It was settled out of court for around 3 million when it was said and done.
  • #130 by batmanfan on 28 Jun 2018
  • <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">Arkansas redshirt freshman Khalil Garland has not been cleared medically for full practices yet, but coach Mike Anderson said he is participating in everything except work where there is contact involved. Also said Garland has shown some leadership during summer workouts.</p>&mdash; Trey Biddy (@TreyBiddy) <a href="https://twitter.com/TreyBiddy/status/1012376955503697922?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">June 28, 2018</a></blockquote>
    <script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>
  • #131 by azhog10 on 28 Jun 2018
  • Now involved in everything except where there is contact.....hopefully this is a sign of things to come.

    https://twitter.com/TreyBiddy/status/1012376955503697922
  • #132 by batmanfan on 28 Jun 2018
  • Ah someone can delete, just saw another thread posted.
  • #133 by niels_boar on 28 Jun 2018
  • Now involved in everything except where there is contact.....hopefully this is a sign of things to come.

    https://twitter.com/TreyBiddy/status/1012376955503697922

    Anybody in the know care to explain why "contact" would be an issue with the heart?  It seems odd to me that physical exertion would not be the primary risk.
  • #134 by widespreadsooie on 28 Jun 2018
  • Anybody in the know care to explain why "contact" would be an issue with the heart?  It seems odd to me that physical exertion would not be the primary risk.

    My thoughts as well.
  • #135 by Fan701 on 28 Jun 2018
  • Anybody in the know care to explain why "contact" would be an issue with the heart?  It seems odd to me that physical exertion would not be the primary risk.

    Yes.  That doesn't sound like a heart problem at all.  Maybe his blood doesn't clot properly and they're concerned about bruising?
  • #136 by VirginiaHog on 28 Jun 2018
  • Same thing since last fall. He could practice and do all drills. Just couldn't do anything with contact.
  • #137 by widespreadsooie on 28 Jun 2018
  • Same thing since last fall. He could practice and do all drills. Just couldn't do anything with contact.

    Trey Biddy seeking attention it appears
  • #138 by HawgsPolo on 28 Jun 2018
  • Trey Biddy seeking attention it appears
  • #139 by Biggus Piggus on 28 Jun 2018
  • What does avoiding contact do for you in basketball?
  • #140 by Kevin McPherson on 28 Jun 2018
  • Nothing new regarding KG than what I reported in the OP over a month ago. Again, he's been given more basketball-related activities but still not participating in competitive contact action. I expect we'll know more in September, or possibly early October when practice is full-go for the team.
  • #141 by klp1 on 29 Jun 2018
  • UAís conditioning program is pretty vigorous. Conditioning ( running )  would seem to be more stressful on heart than just playing/ scrimmaging basketball. Is he fully participating in the conditioning?
  • #142 by TebowHater on 29 Jun 2018
  • Yes.  That doesn't sound like a heart problem at all.  Maybe his blood doesn't clot properly and they're concerned about bruising?

    Coagulopathy is definitely a great thought. Perhaps an enlarged liver or spleen, too, that they have been trying to get to reduce in size - hence the delay and latent hope that it could improve.

    UAís conditioning program is pretty vigorous. Conditioning ( running )  would seem to be more stressful on heart than just playing/ scrimmaging basketball. Is he fully participating in the conditioning?

    Yes.
  • #143 by redneckfriend on 30 Jun 2018
  • Coagulopathy is definitely a great thought. Perhaps an enlarged liver or spleen, too, that they have been trying to get to reduce in size - hence the delay and latent hope that it could improve.

    Yes.


    I don't think that would be quite what was happening i.e. although splenic enlargement can be part of a bleeding disorder there isn't any way the spleen can be "reduced in size" by treatment. Now it can be removed if the sequestration and destruction of platelets is ongoing but that is a surgery and a one time thing.

    If there is truth in what is being reported, and who knows about that- that he his allowed to exercise as hard as he wants but not have contact then I would agree that does not sound like he has a problem with his heart. The whole thing has been a little mysterious since in  general the kinds of cardiac diagnoses that one would expect in someone this age would probably mean his career was over and that doesn't seem to have been decided yet.

    If he does have a bleeding disorder perhaps the most likely candidate would be ITP, an autoimmune disorder of platelets (a formed blood element necessary, along with clotting proteins, for blood to coagulate). ITP can occur in younger people and the reason is usually not clear and it can often resolve spontaneously. It can also be treated if refractory (sometimes by splenectomy). Usually first discovered by abnormal bleeding and then the finding of a low platelet count it requires an extensive workup to rule out other causes but once diagnosed, and if not severe, it is often treated by watchful waiting initially.

    More speculation without much evidence but I agree with others here that something like this seems to be a more likely candidate than a cardiac cause at this point.
  • #144 by Pig in the Pokey on 30 Jun 2018
  • What does avoiding contact do for you in basketball?
    limits liability? only thing i can think of.
  • #145 by PonderinHog on 30 Jun 2018
  • What does avoiding contact do for you in basketball?
    More L's...
  • #146 by logic on 30 Jun 2018
  • I don't believe he will ever play at Arkansas.  Therefore, unless it would harm recruiting and it might, I would give him a medical and free up a scholarship.
  • #147 by The_Bionic_Pig on 30 Jun 2018
  • The 18 class didn't need any scholarships thus no reason to push the issue.  If he is placed on medical hardship he still has his education paid for and is still a UA student unless he transfer's seeking PT.

    Until something is announced I will assume he will return this season due to reports of positive progression with his ailment from 2017 to the present which sounds like it isn't predicated on simple hope. (Basically their keeping him in BASKETBALL SHAPE for a reason)

  • #148 by mbgrulz on 30 Jun 2018
  • I don't believe he will ever play at Arkansas
    Why?
  • #149 by TebowHater on 30 Jun 2018
  • I don't think that would be quite what was happening i.e. although splenic enlargement can be part of a bleeding disorder there isn't any way the spleen can be "reduced in size" by treatment. Now it can be removed if the sequestration and destruction of platelets is ongoing but that is a surgery and a one time thing.

    These were two separate thoughts. Not the coagulopathy causing an enlarged spleen, though indeed, an enlarged spleen could be a cause of a bleeding disorder from platelet consumption or sequestration.

    I was referring to splenomegaly independent of any coagulopathic cause (perhaps from portal hypertension secondary to cirrhosis from hemochromatosis [though he would be young] vs. Wilson's [would seem unlikely] vs. a hepatitis of some sort vs. another infectious etiology OR a primary splenic process such as splenic sequestration from Sickle Cell [demographically possible though would often resolve after the crisis] vs. extramedullary hematopoiesis from a hemolytic anemia or thalassemia vs. a chronic inflammatory or infectious process [SLE, RA, malaria, etc.] vs. a malignant process [e.g. lymphoma]).

    The differential for hepatomegaly is similar and also could result in one being allowed to do anything except contact.

    And an enlarged spleen for basically every one of those processes can definitely reduce in size when the cause for it's enlargement is resolved.
  • #150 by redneckfriend on 30 Jun 2018
  • These were two separate thoughts. Not the coagulopathy causing an enlarged spleen, though indeed, an enlarged spleen could be a cause of a bleeding disorder from platelet consumption or sequestration.

    I was referring to splenomegaly independent of any coagulopathic cause (perhaps from portal hypertension secondary to cirrhosis from hemochromatosis [though he would be young] vs. Wilson's [would seem unlikely] vs. a hepatitis of some sort vs. another infectious etiology OR a primary splenic process such as splenic sequestration from Sickle Cell [demographically possible though would often resolve after the crisis] vs. extramedullary hematopoiesis from a hemolytic anemia or thalassemia vs. a chronic inflammatory or infectious process [SLE, RA, malaria, etc.] vs. a malignant process [e.g. lymphoma]).

    The differential for hepatomegaly is similar and also could result in one being allowed to do anything except contact.

    And an enlarged spleen for basically every one of those processes can definitely reduce in size when the cause for it's enlargement is resolved.


    Yes, but I expect, and just using the things that have been said on this site and not knowing if they are true or not, that whatever is wrong needs to fit certain parameters, those being: he is allowed to exert himself but not have contact activities, they are not declaring him medically unable to play, they seem to be "waiting" for something- either some treatment program that is not so taxing that it prevents him from practicing or just time itself.

     If those things are taken as true then it seems to narrow down the likely candidates. I agree the "exertion but no contact", if that is a fact, element suggests a problem with clotting as more likely than some heart problem. Many of the diseases you mention are so serious however that it would be highly unlikely he could practice, much less be considered possibly eligible to play. He could certainly have a big spleen for some other reason and that could cause a decreased platelet count but then the question would be what was the reason- either it would likely be something so significant that it would disqualify him from playing or they would do a splenectomy to cure the thrombocytopenia.


    Anyway, from that kind of thinking, if he does have a bleeding disorder, it seems that something like ITP, which could have come up unexpectedly after he was offered and often occurs in younger people and which may resolve spontaneously, makes sense. Added to that the diagnosis usually requires a workup to rule out more serious diseases like aplastic anemia, early leukemia etc. and that may have been why the family wanted him evaluated at the Mayo Clinic (which I thought I read he was although maybe I'm not remembering correctly).
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